Pre-K is OK in Oklahoma
As Arkansas begins to develop its state budget priorities for the 2015 legislative session, it would do well to take note of...


We can fight unemployment in Arkansas
High unemployment threatens our economic well-being and the ability of working families to not only make ends meet but to thrive and...


Youth detention should be limited
Youth detention must be utilized carefully to make sure low-level, non-violent youthful offenders do not move deeper into the criminal justice system....


Why quality teachers matter
The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Education reports that students of color experience more suspensions, poorer quality...


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Youth detention should be limited
April 8th 2014

Youth detention must be utilized carefully to make sure low-level, non-violent youthful offenders do not move deeper into the criminal justice system. A new report by Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families says juvenile detention - the short-term involuntary holding of juveniles - is often the gateway to longer-term incarceration and must be used thoughtfully.  

Why quality teachers matter
April 7th 2014

The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Education reports that students of color experience more suspensions, poorer quality teachers, and have access to fewer advanced math and science courses. The findings, released March 14, 2014 demonstrate that students of color experience more negative outcomes with education than white students. The disciplinary concerns were discussed in a recent AACF Blog post. But disparities don't end with disciplinary action. They exist in teacher quality as well.

More negative outcomes for students of color
March 27th 2014

Students of color experience more negative outcomes with education than white students. According to a report by the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Education, students of color experience more suspensions, poorer quality teachers, and have access to fewer advanced math and science courses. The findings, released March 14, 2014, are based on 2012 data. The results are consistent with recent Arkansas research showing similar concerns for minority and low-income students.

Poverty guidelines are out of date
March 18th 2014

The current poverty benchmarks in the United States are miserably out of date, basing their measurements on decades old research. In the 1960s, the average family of three spent about a third of their after tax income on food, so the poverty line was set at about three times the cost of the cheapest food plan from the Department of Agriculture.[i] This way, a family could afford a nutritional diet by spending no more than a third of their income on food. In 1965, this calculation was officially adopted by the Office of Economic Opportunity as the standard measure of poverty, and it hasn't fundamentally changed since.[ii] This guideline for poverty, which was implemented almost half a century ago, has only been updated to account for inflation. The federal poverty line for a family of four is only $23,850 a year.

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Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families
Union Station - 1400 West Markham Suite 306 - Little Rock, AR 72201
Phone: (501) 371-9678 - Fax: (501) 371-9681 - Email: info@aradvocates.org